Notes From The Margin

June 16, 2008

Marginal Picks Up His Pen – Venezuelas Claim of Barbados’ Waters


After much thought we’ve decided to come out of retirement to blog on the subject of Venezuela’s claim of Barbados’ waters. This is not a full re-opening of NFTM but we felt that given our history of blogging on Venezuela and it’s territorial claims that we might be able to provide some clarity on this issue. This article is freely reproducible (once the source is attributed). In fact we would ask that given the potential seriousness of the claim that members of the blogosphere and other media propogate this story.


Marginal

Like Barbados Free Press we saw the story today in the Venezuelan publication PetroleumWorld entitled “Barbados’ Troubled Waters”

The new government of Barbados opened the bidding process for rights to offshore blocks for oil & gas exploration on Monday and will close it on September 30. The winner announcement will be made on Nov 20th. More than 20 companies were present this week in the bid kick off, including among others, Exxon, Gazprom, Lukoil Shell, BHP Billiton of Australia, Hess Oil Company, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, Marathon Oil and Murphy Oil, all of the United States, StatoilHydro, Petro-Canada, and Petrobras from Brazil. However, there is an issue that the IOC’s perhaps have not taken in account, that is that two of the block are in venezuelan waters, the Bottom Bay blocks Ad I and Ad II. We expect that the venezuelan government will issue a diplomatic note to the government of Barbados asking for clarification and the Venezuelan oil company PDVSA will issue a warning to the OIC’s on the issue.

The two blocks in question are the two southernmost blocks that are up for bid (Highlighted in red in the illustration). Venezuela’s claim rests on two pillars

1. It’s claim to approximately half of Guyana’s land area.

Venezuela claims everything west of the Essequibo river, the historical reasons for this can be found in our post. Venezuela and Its Claim of Most of Guyana’s Land

2. Venezuela’s Maritime Treaty with Trinidad.

In 1990 Venezuela and Trinidad agreed a treaty delineating their maritime boundary. This treaty can be found on line HERE.  This treaty allowed the development of Trinidad and Tobago’s offshore oil resources. However this treaty had two unforeseen impacts. First it tacitly recognised Venezuela’s claims on half of Guyana, and secondly it pushed Trinidad’s territorial claims north which is what led to the Maritime border dispute between Barbados and Trinidad. The impact of this can be seen in our post How Much Gas Does Trinidad Have? Indeed the main sticking point in the negotiations was the Trinidadian position that Barbados should recognise the 1990 treaty. The UNLOS council held that two countries could not bind a third without it’s consent and hence the 1990 treaty had no impact on Barbados.

The maritime boundaries are currently as seen in the diagram below. The purple line indicates Trinidad’s initial boundary claim and the brown line indicates the claim they put forward to the UNLOS Council. The green line represents the final decision of the UNLOS Council.

The result of the UNLOS is that the 1990 boundary between Venezuela and Trinidad extends into what is (and always was) legally Barbados’ waters.

Venezuela is now seeking to exercise a claim in an area that it has no right to claim. The waters under discussion can ONLY be Venezuelas if you accept that

1. Half of Guyana is actually Venezuela.

2. That two countries (Venezuela and Trinidad) can commit a third and fourth countries (Barbados and Guyana)  to some form of agreement or treaty without consulting them and without their agreement.

In short, the Venezuelan claim is baseless.

Marginal

Other interesting information on this topic.

International Law Environment by Professor Robert Volterra

Venezuela and Bird Island

Details on Aves Island – How Venezuela Controls the Caribbean Sea

Bird Island Again! – Grenada in Maritime Boundary Dispute With Venezuela.

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5 Comments »

  1. Welcome back. Excellent to see NFTM wading in with a third party perspective.

    Comment by Bajan Fuh Real — June 17, 2008 @ 2:45 am | Reply

  2. [...] Notes From The Margin sheds some light on the Barbados/Venezuela maritime controversy, saying: “The waters under discussion can ONLY be Venezuela's if you accept that 1. Half of Guyana is actually Venezuela. 2. That two countries (Venezuela and Trinidad) can commit a third and fourth countries (Barbados and Guyana) to some form of agreement…without consulting them.” Posted by Janine Mendes-Franco Share This [...]

    Pingback by Global Voices Online » Barbados, Venezuela: Maritime Claim — June 17, 2008 @ 6:33 am | Reply

  3. Anyone want to bet that Hugo Chavez Frias and his increasingly dictatorial and militaristic mien and recent erratic behaviour of the last 3 weeks, will press Venezuela’s claim of these waters either to 1.) just to pressure BGI to sign the lopsided Petrocaribe Treaty (and presumably “buy” BGI’s vote when needed on international matters of interest to Venezuela) or 2.) to “punish” us for not signing the Treaty by scaring the oil companies away from the bidding process since no entity will purchase an exploration block for which ownership is in dispute. Any takers on this bet?

    Comment by Richhughes — June 19, 2008 @ 11:24 pm | Reply

  4. Good to see you back, Marginal.

    Comment by Carson C. Cadogan — June 26, 2008 @ 7:30 pm | Reply

  5. What is the size of the block Venezuela is claiming

    Comment by Mac — August 2, 2008 @ 9:21 pm | Reply


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